Nuclear Zero

The concept of nuclear zero traces its roots back to President Reagan’s call for eliminating nuclear weapons as a “threat to the world.” Following is analysis and opinion from Ploughshares Fund staff, grantees and guests on the efforts and progress toward nuclear zero.
One trillion dollars. That is what the United States is planning to spend over the next 30 years as it refurbishes and maintains its aging Cold War nuclear arsenal. Your share as an average taxpayer: $6,789. These weapons do nothing to protect the United States in a post-9/11 world. But they still present catastrophic risk due to accident, miscalculation or (shudder) deliberate use. What can you do to help roll back the nuclear weapons tide? Read more »
Posted by Eric Sutphin on July 16, 2014
Browsing the headlines, the world looks a dangerous place. Boko Haram is bombing its way across Nigeria, civil war in Syria, transnational terrorism and more. But the biggest danger is conspicuously absent from the headlines: the world’s 17,000 nuclear weapons. Read more »
Posted by Eric Sutphin on July 11, 2014
As the P5+1 negotiations with Iran continue, there are grounds for optimism that an agreement can be reached by the July 20th deadline. A deal would be a significant achievement in the ongoing battle against the proliferation of nuclear weapons. But this raises the question: what about the rest of the world’s nuclear weapons? Read more »
Posted by Eric Sutphin on July 2, 2014
It started with one explosion in 1945. An explosion unlike any the world had ever seen. The first nuclear weapon, detonated by the United States, launched an era of nuclear proliferation that persists to this day. With the end of the Cold War, nuclear weapons are increasingly irrelevant, but the threat they represent is still very real. The tide of proliferation has ebbed. Now we have the chance to roll it back to end the threat of nuclear weapons forever. Read more »
Posted by Peter Fedewa on July 1, 2014
I first learned about the inaugural Hale Fellowship from a former member of the Ploughshares Fund team who raved about her tenure on staff. I served as a presidential appointee at the Department of Energy during the debate on ratification of the New START Treaty in 2010. That debate introduced me to Ploughshares Fund’s mission and the vital role that members of the peace and security community play in shaping US foreign policy. Read more »
Posted by Blake Narendra on May 5, 2014
In 2007, a high school student by the name of Jennifer Barlow created the global phenomenon known as Dark Sky Week, urging people to reduce human-produced light pollution and to preserve the brilliance of the Milky Way. As we celebrate the end of this year’s Dark Sky Week, we couldn’t help but wish that nuclear testing hasn’t been lighting the skies ablaze with thermal radiation for 69 years. Read more »
Posted by Amanda Waldron on April 25, 2014
Tomorrow, April 19, marks the eighth consecutive international Record Store Day, a tribute to the over 1000 independently-owned businesses that continue to sell good ole phonograph discs. In an age of instant downloading and the digital revolution, the world is making an effort to revive a unique technology of the past. At the same time, the topic of many vinyl records, nuclear weapons, is being forgotten. Read more »
Posted by Amanda Waldron on April 18, 2014
Nuclear Zero
  On the radar: Nuclear deal in the forecast; Fear of sanctions hampers good faith transactions; the Crimea crisis and nuclear zero; Pentagon plans to plan nuclear force cuts; NNSA finds budget numbers that make it look good; DOE to subsidize the unaffordable; Moscow forgets about Lisbon Agreement; and North Korea makes Asian pivot deployments possible.   Read more »
Posted on April 7, 2014
The number of nuclear weapons in the world tops 17,000, yet none of them belong to Iran. While negotiators work for a verifiable deal that would prevent Iran from ever obtaining nuclear arms – it’s important to remember that the current negotiations also have the potential to strengthen international security, and move us forward on a path to a nuclear weapons-free tomorrow. Read more »
Posted by Emily Hauser on March 10, 2014
Nuclear Zero, Iran
Recent discoveries of fraud and cheating among U.S. nuclear personnel stand in stark contrast to the  Pentagon’s continued support for nuclear weapons programs and budgets. Why do we insist on keeping these obsolete weapons despite their fading utility? To get some answers, we reached out to our grantee, Stephen Young, a senior analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists. Here, he gives us the expert scoop on how and why the U.S. can get rid of the weapons we don’t need and take better care of the stockpile while it remains. Read more »
Posted by Amanda Waldron on March 6, 2014