Nuclear Budget

The U.S. nuclear weapons budget is vast, difficult to decipher and rife with waste and excess. Following is analysis and opinion from Ploughshares Fund staff, grantees and guests on the continuing effort to shed light on and ultimately correct the nuclear budget.
No one likes tax day. The paperwork. The anticipation of a return. The shock of owing more. None of it is fun. Least of all paying for wasteful programs that do little to nothing to keep the American people safe. Like upgrading bombs that cost more than their weight in gold. Or building new nuclear weapons that will never be used. It turns out, on average, each of us paid about $81.50 in nuclear weapons taxes in 2013. Read more »
Posted by admin on April 15, 2014
On April 5th 2009, Barack Obama gave an unprecedented speech in Prague, in which he dedicated his presidency to laying the ground work for a world without nuclear weapons. “As the only nuclear power to have ever used a nuclear weapon,” he said, “the United States has a moral responsibility to act.” Today, an out-of-control nuclear weapons budget threatens that vision. Read more »
Posted by Amanda Waldron on April 7, 2014
Over the past two weeks, experts have published over two dozen articles criticizing the nuclear spending plans in President Obama's defense budget for Fiscal Year 2015, a notable increase in the level of discussion on this topic. Below, we provide, by date of publication, some of the best stories on the nuclear budget and why experts believe these plans do not match our real defense needs. Read more »
Posted by Lauren Mladenka on March 12, 2014
Nuclear Budget
  Ukraine, Russia and the Legacy of Nuclear Weapons On the radar: Would nuclear weapons in Ukraine have stopped Russia; MOX plant goes into cold storage; Russian nuclear forces review; Iran cuts enriched uranium; and Castle Bravo and the CTBT.   Read more »
Posted on March 4, 2014
  On the radar: SANE Act and REIN-IN; Maddow on the arsenal; Senate letter on Iran; Iran cuts stockpile of uranium; North Korea missile launches; Uncertain nuclear waste plan; Castle Bravo after 60; and the Nuclear Genie.   Read more »
Posted on March 3, 2014
Bailout was a naval term before it was a financial term. Bailing out a ship means, essentially, to save a sinking ship by taking a bucket and heaving water overboard. Since the financial collapse, the term has also meant giving taxpayer money to insolvent businesses. So the bailout metaphor is particularly fitting when the Navy appeals to Congress for a taxpayer cash when the cost of new nuclear submarines threatens to sink the Navy’s shipbuilding budget. Read more »
Posted by Ben Loehrke on October 1, 2013
  On the radar: 10 projects, $16 billion over budget, 38 years behind schedule; Iran reduces uranium stockpile; Navy wants a sub bailout; the Iran & Syria nexus; Missile defense in the rust belt; and What the Nazis knew about the Manhattan Project.   Read more »
Posted on September 13, 2013
In our recent call to reallocate U.S. nuclear spending to programs that better address 21st century security concerns, we asked people to tell us what they would buy with the $11.6 billion the U.S. expect to spend updating the B61 – a budget busting relic of the Cold War that is stationed in Europe. Here’s what a few of you had to say. Read more »
Posted by admin on July 18, 2013
Days may be numbered for the budget busting B61 nuclear bomb. This bomb, first deployed in Europe to fight the Cold War, is facing serious challenges in Congress from both Democrats and Republicans. Read more »
Posted by admin on July 16, 2013
When we published our infographic demonstrating that planned replacements for the B-61 bombs would be worth more than the bomb’s actual weight in gold, we were reminded that the argument had been used before – by one of our most stalwart supporters. Read more »
Posted by Elizabeth Rogers on July 10, 2013